Just a Coincidence?

Several readers have pointed out an eerie case of foreshadowing of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center in an old issue of National Lampoon. The issue in question, March ’75 (Good-bye to All That), featured a parody of a disaster movie poster, "Gone With the Wind ’75". Among the disasters depicted in the poster is the twin towers burning just as they did last September. If the predictive powers of this poster prevail, New Yorkers can also look forward to killer bees, a tidal wave, a volcano, and a mid-air collision of a jumbo jet and the Goodyear blimp.

More On XM Radio

I’ve received some schedule info about National Lampoon Radio Hour broadcasts on XM Satellite Radio. A new show is broadcast every Saturday (7-8 a.m. in the East, 4-5 a.m. in the West) and repeated on Monday (3-4 p.m. in the East, noon-1 p.m. in the West) and Wednesday (midnight-1 a.m. in the East, 9-10 p.m. in the West).

XM’s competitor in the digital satellite radio biz, Sirius Radio, also broadcasts National Lampoon Radio Hour shows on their “Sirius Comedy” channel 160, but I don’t have any other information about them at this time.

National Lampoon Radio Hour Now on XM Satellite Radio

Shows of the National Lampoon Radio Hour are now being broadcast in their entirety on a regular basis on XM’s comedy station, XM Comedy 150. I can’t tell from their website how often “regular” is. A special receiver is required to pick up the broadcasts, which they claim is higher quality than conventional radio since it’s all-digital. You can’t listen on an ordinary radio, or even over the internet (although they do offer samples on their site). Still, having the shows broadcast at all is a good thing. Update: They seem to have removed that stuff.

"Who Am I?"

Out of the blue, I just heard Brian McConnachie do a very funny piece on NPR’s All Things Considered. He’s just as absurd and funny in his inimitable way as he was at National Lampoon back in the seventies. First PBS kids’ shows and now this. Wonders never cease.

Michael Gross, Alive and Well

Michael Gross, art director of National Lampoon from 1970 through 1974, is alive and well and living in Oceanside, California, where he is a curator at the Oceanside Museum of Art. I’ve (finally) added his bio to the Staff & Contributors section.

What’s He Doing Here?

Steve and his little friendQuite a few back issues of National Lampoon are on sale at The Mad Store, according to proprietor Scott Gosar, pictured at left. He’s the one shoving the Idiot™ into the trash can.